We encourage & assist folks to grow food for self and neighbor

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Post Industrial Cities and Food Movement Roles Models

Amidst the growth and details of plants, gardens, recipes, farmers' markets, kids' gardens, workshops and the like, I am sustained by encountering and re-encountering a few of my food movement role-models.  Let me introduce (or re-introduce) you to three people/organizations that I draw on regularly.

Last Thursday evening, I joined the FAMU Environmental Sciences Student Organization for a screening of Urban Roots, a film about Urban Farming in Detroit.



The film suggests that Detroit is paving the way and providing an example of what post industrial cities will or could morph into-- especially in terms of resilient, community-based food systems. An inspiring movie of possibility.  I was especially attuned to the words of Malik Yakini, Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network since we met and had lunch last November out in California at the CFSC conference in Oakland.  He is especially interested in involving black folks in urban agriculture, which he believes offers a chance of individual and community self-determination and control over one's food system.  My favorite section in the movie was when Malik related a McDonnald's commercial he'd seen that stated, "Leave breakfast to the experts."  He suggested that implicit in that tagline is a dangerous-- albeit possibly true--assumption that we don't know how to cook or are incapable of cooking our own food. Talk about a vulnerable and dependent position to be in!

Point being, a great movie of challenge and growing success.

For additional inspiration, take a look at what Rashid, Eugene, Carol and their fellow accomplices are up to in Atlanta at Truly Living Well.




Also take notes on Will Allen at Growing Power in Milwaukee.


I was blessed to chat with both the Truly Living Well team and Will (and his cousin Gary) from Growing Power this past weekend at the Georgia Organics conference in Columbus, GA.  More on that later.

The food movement grows, feeds, and sustains.

Locally, stay abreast of what's going on by tuning into the Tallahassee Food Network Calendar.

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